Convergent Design announces Odyssey7Q+ with 4K over HDMI

Field recorders

Odyssey7Q+
4K over HDMI: the Odyssey 7Q+ adds recording options via HDMI 1.4b. Picture: Convergent Design.


Convergent Design has announced a new version of its Odyssey7 field monitor and recorder family, the Odyssey7Q+.

The new model can record video in both UHD and 4K resolutions, opening up recording from HDMI-only cameras such as the Panasonic GH4 (without a YAGH adapter), the Sony A7S, as well as offering 4K recording over SDI.

The new recorder features an HDMI 1.4b port, and offers a range of supported formats, including Apple ProRes, DPX, and RAW; the RAW recording options can be either bought or rented, and include an option for the Sony FS-7, and for the Canon C500.

The monitor itself is a 1200×800 unit supporting waveforms, histograms, focus assist and false colour. The screen can monitor using LUTs, for shooters working in Log modes, and in HD mode, the 7Q+, like the 7Q, can act as a quad-stream viewer or live switcher, for HD signals.

The new 7Q+ will replace the 7Q in production. As on earlier models, recording is to Convergent Design SSDs; the company also announced a 1TB recording module. This gives up to 11 hours of ProRes HQ recording, at 24fps.

On the Odyssey7Q+ and 7Q, two 1TB units can be combined to give 22 hours’ recording time, or five hours’ shooting in 4K ProRes. Convergent Design is pricing the 1TB drive at $1395, or $1.36 per gigabyte. To run the new drives, Odyssey owners will need to install a new firmware version, due to be released this month.

The Odyssey7Q+ is set to go on sale this month, priced at $2295. The company has also set up a loyalty programme for existing 7Q units, which will see their warranty extended for a year, and $500 applied to their Convergent Design account, if they now buy an Odyssey7Q+. Convergent Design will also replicate any existing RAW recording options, including those for Sony, Canon and ARRI, onto the new Odyssey7Q+ unit – potentially saving over $6000 for producers who have bought multiple recording options.